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Maderno
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Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
ECOMUSEO
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
Toscolano Maderno
Toscolano Maderno
Toscolano Maderno
Toscolano Maderno
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
Valle delle Cartiere
Toscolano Maderno
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
Toscolano Maderno
Toscolano Maderno
ECOMUSEO
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
EcoMuseo Valle delle Cartiere
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
Valle delle Cartiere Toscolano Maderno
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Valle delle Cartiere
Toscolano Maderno
created by the sculptor Leonardo Bistol- fi, who entitled it “A far-away shore’s de- sire”. He originally directed the woman’s face, which was an hometown symbol, to the East, towards Trieste, yet submit- ted to Austria at that time.
The square
As we continue our beautiful walk to- wards the country-town centre, we come to Maderno square(6), dedicated to the memory of St Mark, that until 1939 had no asphalt-coverage. This meant lots of dust in the dry season and plenty of mud in the wet season, at the time when the dirty waters of “di dietro” “di mezzo” and “della chiesa” streets joined together before going into the lake (The- se were the actual Montana street, Ga- ribaldi street and Benamati street). Here the boats came on shore, here took pla- ce the above-cited open-air market, un- derwear was put here to make it get dry.
In front of St. Andrew’s cathedral stairs was situated, protected by a 100-year- old tree called “people’s poplar”, a cir- cle-shaped stone where a public officer jumped to read the public announce- ments. After, that stone had been re-uti- lized for the basis of the new cathedral in 1782. The gulf functioned as a port. In 1899, the square’s aspect changed. With the construction of the provincial
The linen bleaching on Rivellino’s beach
In Salò, starting already from high-medieval times, the production of linen was very relevant; it counted more than 60 linen- production mills. In 1520, Venice abrogated the entrance-tax for that product, that afterwards was shipped towards the most important Mediterranean ports and to India, too. Among the various linen-production processes which led at last to the refined material, there was the “bleaching”, taking place usually on the local-beaches’ sand. In Maderno, the beach near St. Mark’s square (Known as “Rivellino’s Beach”) was used, after the winter season, for this particular activity. Where the hotels “Milano” and “Splendid” are today situated, existed in the past some rooms which were property of the local town-hall. That rooms were utilized every year for the production of linen. This activity definitely stopped after the first half of 19th century because of the appearance of a new powerful spinning-machine from England.
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